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More anglerfish, amphipods, and updates!

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Hey Kids! The DEEPEND scientists are still going strong in the Gulf of Mexico! The team has officially been at sea for twelve days and they are extremely excited to share their updates with us!

 

Below we have a juvenile anglerfish! You can see that the "fishing rod and lure" has just formed on its forehead but it hasn't developed any adult coloration yet.

b2ap3_thumbnail_juvenile-angler-DP04.jpg

 

The scientist have also seen some beautiful deep water amphipods on this trip. This species in particular lives on jellyfish!

b2ap3_thumbnail_deepw-ater-amphipod.jpg

 

Below we have the biggest helmet jellyfish I've ever seen! This deep sea jellyfish is a vertical migrator, which means it actually lives deep down in the ocean, but migrates up to shallower waters at night to feed on plankton. It also has bioluminescent properties which allows it to communicate.

b2ap3_thumbnail_Cone-jelly-.jpg

The scientists also bought up this bristlemouth ( image below) that has a parasitic copepod on its back! These parasites are also commonly found on the back of hatchetfish.

b2ap3_thumbnail_Sigmops-DP04.jpg

 

Until next time!

 

 

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Nicole's love for animals and nature started at a young age during her summer vacations with her grandmother. As a teen she started volunteering at the San Antonio Zoo and realized she could never leave nature behind. For the DEEPEND project, Nicole manages the Kid's Blog and all the social media sites. Her goal is to provide the science of this project to a larger audience, specifically targeting children. She hopes to inspire the next generation of researchers and biologists. Nicole now works as a Conservation Technician at the San Antonio Zoo.

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Guest Friday, 15 December 2017